Bring Back Matron

Those were the days when matron ‘ruled the roost’ – woe betide anyone who stepped out of line! The old matrons ruled with an iron fist and commanded huge respect in the hospitals. They held both power and authority and as a result our hospitals were spotlessly clean.

Nowadays, by comparison our hospitals are filthy and it seems that nobody wants to take responsibility. Better hygiene is the only way to ward off superbugs. MRSA has been shown to survive in dust and dead skin cells. It doesn’t matter how much hand washing is done – to please our Minister for Health – if the hospital environment is dirty, the spread of infection will never be stopped . De-contamination of the hospital wards and equipment is essential if we are to curb the rise of the MRSA superbug.

We need to put Matron back where she belongs – in charge!


3 Responses to Bring Back Matron

  1. Tom says:

    You’re blog is inspirational, I wish there was something that could be done about the state of the health service and the mindsets of those in Government.

  2. Steph says:

    Thanks Tom! It’s great to get some feedback, whether negative or positive.

    I came across a very funny blog today where the Government was described as “weapons of mass corruption”. Great stuff can be found at

    http://www.headrambles.com/

  3. Craig says:

    I would love to have an “old fashioned” Matron on the wards today, our Modern Matrons are, from what I’ve observed, office-bound entities; we need someone out there on the floor, someone both we the staff and our patients know is in charge. Hospitals have become too soft lately. Just the other day a colleague of mine had to ARGUE her point for asking a relative not to sit on the bed their father was staying in, as she was met with confrontation on asking them to use a chair she provided. The simple reason is infection control. Bring back someone who has the authority to defend us, and help us that are willing to reduce the risk of our patients jeopardising their health and extending their admission with nosocomial infections.

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