Facing the Facts

August 3, 2008

When someone receives a diagnosis of cancer it is the beginning of a long, lonely journey. Demystifying cancer is crucial, according to oncologist Dr. Robert Buckman, and leads to a greater ability to cope. Buckman is the author of a new book called Cancer is a Word, Not a Sentence, in which he gives readers clear, calm and concise explanations of a range of cancers from diagnosis to treatment. His aim is to help people recently diagnosed with cancer, to get over the initial shock and cope better with the facts of their situation.

In the book, Buckman gives clear advice on the do’s and don’ts following diagnosis.

DO try to a get a reasonable, general overview of your type of cancer.

DO get a small amount of trustworthy current information from a few reputable cancer websites.

DO accept, which means admit and acknowledge to yourself any uncertainty about the diagnosis and/or treatment. Uncertainty is always unpleasant but easier to cope with if you acknowledge that fact.

DO ask your medical team a few specific questions once you understand the general overview of your situation.

DO get a second opinion if you really think you need it.

DO talk to your friends and family.

DO breathe. Do spend a little bit of time every day doing something you really enjoy and thus look forward to it.

DON’T respond simply to the word cancer as a universal and total signal of doom and gloom.

DON’T go to the internet and collect hundreds of different views, opinions, home remedies and fringe medications.

DON’T think that things won’t change after you hear the first view of the diagnosis and treatment. Plans may well change as time goes on, so try to stay as flexible as possible.

DON’T or try not to ask the same questions too often. Asking over and over again usually means that it’s difficult for you to accept the answers.

DON’T get a third opinion if the second opinion is the same as the first.

DON’T feel you have to hold all your concerns and worries in until you know all the answers.

DON’T panic. There is plenty of time to get informed and make decisions.

Adapted from Cancer is a Word, Not a Sentence by Dr. Robert Buckman (Collins UK £9.99)

Cancer threatens fundamental assumptions about our lives. People’s personalities, coping styles, expectations, and past experiences all influence the impact of a cancer diagnosis. This book aims to help those with cancer understand better every aspect of their disease so that they can let go some of their fears and face the facts. Sound advice indeed.